Tuesday, January 31, 2012

IWSG: Jealousy Among Writers



I’m posting a day early for Alex J. Cavanaugh’s Insecure Writer’s Support Group held on the first Wednesday of every month.  I don’t personally have anything to complain about, but I have noticed something in the blogosphere lately and I was wondering what you all thought about it.

Last week, agent Rachelle Gardner wrote a post called Watch Out for the Green Eyed Monster where she discusses jealousy among writers.  She even expressed how she was envious when an agent friend of hers recently completed a great deal.  She was happy for her, of course, but she was also the tiniest bit jealous. 


I’ve met a great many writers here on Blogger, Wordpress, and other sources.  Most of them are like me.  They’ve written or are writing a novel and all that that encompasses, and they’re hoping and dreaming and even struggling to find and land that perfect agent, someone who believes in their writing, their project, and their beloved characters.  But there are quite a few who have recently bagged that elusive agent.  Even some who have secured a publishing contract or might be on their second or third book. 

Often, these writers make their incredible announcements via their blogs or Twitter, sharing their excitement at achieving their dream.  Most of their followers comment, expressing their joy and pride.  But as time wears on, some writers notice a lag in their comments.  Some writers have blogged about how they receive nasty emails from people, often other writers who are consumed with envy. 


NatalieWhipple at Between Fact and Fiction has struggled for many, many years, writing something like 9 or 10 novels.  A few years ago, Natalie managed to snag former agent-superstar Nathan Bransford only to lose him when he retired from agenting and the publishing business.  She landed on her feet though and acquired another agent.  After enduring something like 15 months on submission, Natalie and her agent finally gave up that particular book, but Natalie had another which was eventually scooped up by a publisher, and she was even given an option for a second book.  She is currently awaiting publication sometime in 2013.  Oh happy day, right?  Yeah, not so much.

Natalie has posted several times about how people were not always so happy for her success.  Apparently, there were quite a few who sent vicious emails, something I cannot understand myself because Natalie is just about the sweetest, kindest, most generous blogger out there, and she has shared every up and down along the way, of which there have been many.  I read a comment once that said writers who reach their dream no longer post about their struggles and therefore all the tension is removed from their blog.  I guess I can see his point, but this is not the case with Natalie.  She still posts about her struggles.  So what’s with all the jealousy?


It’s not like the other writers are taking a spot that we could have had for ourselves.  Each of our novels are so different, so unique.  I understand it’s hard not to want what they have, to achieve the same dream, but to be angry or jealous?  That I don’t get.  When I read about another writer landing an agent, sure, I say, “Boy, I wish that could be me,” but I also say, “See, there is hope.”  Because that is exactly what it gives me:  hope, that I might achieve the same thing someday. 

Of course, it all does depend on the attitude of the writer.  There is one particular writer whom many of us know.  We’ve seen her query up on QueryShark, her first page up on Suzie Townsend’s  First Page Shooter.  She had several offers and had her pick of agents, even got a book deal a few weeks later.  That’s every writer’s dream.  But this gal also has an abundance of self-worth, perhaps caused by all the attention.  But she hasn’t missed the opportunity to belittle other writers and their work on a certain popular blog, offering her opinion at their expense.  She still blogs from time to time, but she gets almost no comments any more.  She’s lost her following just when she needs it most.  I guess I can understand that a little, but still, writing is a relatively small community, and we are all greatly connected, so tearing someone down because of their success is like burning a bridge directly into the community in which you dream to be a part of.


So what do you think?  Is it difficult to see your friends and colleagues reach milestones before you do?  Or do you think of it as proof that all the hard work is worth it, that you can get there, too?  Does it give you hope or dash your dreams?                   

61 comments:

JeffO said...

I think it's perfectly human to be jealous, and that a little jealousy (note 'little') can be good fuel for pushing harder to achieve your own success. But, I don't get becoming nasty to a person who has achieved success. That doesn't make sense to me at all.

As for this other author you mention, I don't know who you're talking about, but it sounds like maybe she's made her own bed to a certain extent. IF she 'hasn’t missed the opportunity to belittle other writers and their work on a certain popular blog, offering her opinion at their expense', then she doesn't sound like a person I'd really want to follow and interact with, especially if that was something that developed after she got her own deal. Spoiled by success?

Anyway, I prefer to be publicly happy for my friends who land deals. I'll type up nice, congratulatory messages, then push away from the computer and stomp around the room like a petulant child. Just kidding. Mostly. I really am happy for them, it's not just a public show.

Accidentalwriter said...

Hi Nancy. I guess this is one of the vagaries of the human condition. I think our societies have placed such a strong emphasis on success (at any cost) - and therefore, the winner takes it all mentality appears to be thriving in many quarters. The win-win scenarios seem to have been consumed by the Gordon Gekko approach of 'greed is good' - and 'eliminating' or 'disempowering' the competion would appear to be the preferred option of the apparent new order. It's probably easy for me to discuss as I have no ambition to ever have my work published and so the success of others is inconsequential in many ways - apart from the fact that I am very happy for the people who have achieved something they have so desperately desired and worked so hard for. My first ever post was titled 'Love is the Answer' and it's focus was primarily on how a paradigm shift could change the 'never give a sucker an even break' mentality, etc. I know it's very much a rose-coloured glasses perception - however, building up rather than tearing down could have all the warm fuzzy benefits and still reap rewards for the many. Perhaps success is something to be wary of or at the very least treated with great caution. I think it would be a very sad day if the sense of goodwill is diminished and we are unable to embrace the achievements of others. For me, at the end of the day, if we are able to derive pleasure from other people's success - we should be happy most of the time - and that's a pretty good outcome in the scheme of things. Best wishes. Jeff.

Tara Tyler said...

this happens in every walk of life. many will be jealous. i'm jealous, but i wont linger on it and i will congratulate and them winning an agent gives me hope. it's just how some people handle that feeling. there will always be a few that feel the need to take their own disappointment out on a "winner" in a vocal way. same with reviews, some want to be heard and cant hold back or be tactful. we have to be aware that everyone has an opinion and different ways to express them. we need thick skins, nothing is personal, it cant be, they dont know us!

as for less comments, i see that. its like when couples start getting married & having kids, their circle of friends changes. less singles, more families like them dealing with same problems. agented authors have different problems that we dont relate to yet...

great thot provoking post!

Liza said...

I guess I prefer the word envious to jealous, and I think it's natural to feel envy. But in my mind, people who succeed, attract a publisher, get a book deal, have earned it. They've developed the idea and performed the hard work that has resulted in the achievement. I'm not there yet. I haven't developed a work to the point it merits that kind of success. It's up to me to make it happen. I'm pleased when a writer friend finds success. It makes me know I need to work harder.

Sarah Pearson said...

I'm in such a different place to writers looking for agents and publishing deals that I can honestly say I feel nothing but joy when I read the news. It may be a different story when I'm looking for my own agent, sure I may feel twinges of envy. You're right though, someone else having it doesn't mean I can't have it too, and as for being mean, there is never any excuse. Not when you're a five year old in the playground , or when you're an author with a multi-book deal, or when someone has something you want.

Freya Morris said...

I had no idea that it was so bad out there! My oh my!

It's true that I feel a twinge of jealousy when I hear of someone's success but it quickly passes. Tearing someone down or being jealous doesn't get me anywhere. Being jealous sometimes motivates me and sometimes it demotivates me - depends how many rejections I've had lately. : D

Heidi Tighe said...

I'm not at the querying stage, so I'm not sure what it's like to see others succeed while I fail, but I can imagine that it might be frightening. Deep down inside, I bet a person wonders, "If we've both written as much (or I've written more), and we've both worked as hard (or I've worked harder), and s/he has succeeded while I haven't, what if that means that s/he has something I don't? What if s/he is a better writer or has better ideas or is just more talented? What if the fact that I'm not succeeding at this point means that I never will?"

I bet those are scary things to wonder, and as we all know, fear begets anger and meanness.

At least that's my theory.

Lisa L. Regan said...

Most of the time I am quite happy for others' success but I will admit to a lot of "I wish that could be me" feelings. I guess that constitutes jealousy but it's not usually directed at the writer personally--more at the state of things generally. Like you said, oftentimes it's like comparing oranges and apples, peoples' work is so unique. But there have been times that as happy as I am for the person is as crappy I feel about my own situation. It's not a matter of wishing anyone ill, just me feeling low about myself. I think this is a natural thing to feel and I always make it my goal to channel it properly (i.e. into making my own work better). Mainly though, other writers' success makes me hopeful. If they can do it, so can I! I think it's all in how you choose to view things. I try to acknowledge any negative feelings I have about my own situation in comparison to others and then move away from it. I don't believe negativity will bring anything good into my life. I will say though that as a rule, when I watch an author rise up through the process and achieve success and then they treat others like poop, I straight up do not like that and do not believe they are deserving of success. There's just no call to act that way. This business is hard enough, we should be helping each other as much as we can to reach our goals. Also, I have noticed that on the blogs of writers who have "made it" (i.e. have books out), if they DO complain about anything, a lot of readers will make comments to the effect that they shouldn't complain since they have a book published. I think what people don't realize is that once you finally get that elusive book deal, then the work begins! There are stressors and pitfalls throughout the process, not just at the beginning or middle. Even at the pinnacle it's not all roses and warm fuzzies. Great post!

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Wow, I can't imagine getting hate emails or anything! That is terrible. I feel really fortunate no one has ever done that to me.
Sad the one who's now belittling others. Crap, half the writers out there are ten times better than me! I sometimes let people know when something awesome happens, and I really hope no one sees it as bragging. I'd like to think people look at me and think "If he made it, then I'll achieve even more!"

Jami Gold said...

Great post, Nancy! As others have mentioned, I think it's normal human nature to be envious when others have what we've worked hard for, especially if we think they're less deserving than we are.

In the writing world, we often see each other's work on blogs, first page contests, and things like that, and so it's easy for us to pass judgment on their "talent." Then when we see someone get an agent or publisher and think their writing is less than ours, we'd have to be almost inhuman not to feel a twinge of something.

But on the other hand, everyone's journey is so different. Their goals are different. Maybe they got an agent or publisher, but it wouldn't be the agent or publisher we'd choose. Or maybe they're less picky about contract issues than we would have been, so we'd have turned it down anyway.

My point is that every time I've been faced with this situation, I've been able to see how I wouldn't want to be in their *exact* shoes, and that helps me simply be happy for them. No envy, no jealousy--just happy. :)

Carrie Butler said...

We live in a digital age where success stories are abundant and reactions are archived. Whether we like to admit it or not, our words have weight. They have meaning beyond our intentions. It’s easy to hide behind the anonymity of text, but that doesn’t take away the responsibility. When we put something out there, it’s going to affect many, many people. People we’ll likely never met.

Jealousy can rear its ugly head from time to time, but we can’t afford to discourage each other. Not now. Not ever. There’s too much at stake. Too many good books we might lose out on.

Besides, like you said, success stories should give us hope. We can look at them and say, “Yes! It does happen!” :) Great post, Nancy!

Kittie Howard said...

I understand being motivated and working hard and hoping a dream comes true. Having said that, if achieving X goal (whether publishing a novel or not) becomes so intense cut-throat tactics evolve that demean others, the problem's not with the dream but with the person. The wheels of justice are slow but they are exceedingly fine.

Nancy Thompson said...

The mills of the gods! Yes, I know that one! It's karma!!

L.G.Smith said...

I never begrudge anyone their success. Most people work hard for it (even when they try to make it look like they haven't). Not sure why some people lash out at others the way they do. There's enough opportunity out there for anyone with the drive and talent to see it through, IMO.

Lynda R Young said...

Gosh, I must be seriously naive because I'm always so happy for the writers who finally get an agent or a contract. The whole process takes forever and it requires heroic persistence. Even when it appears fast, I know it's not. They still had to work hard to get to where they are.

Richard said...

You've touched on a very important topic. Good post.

Mark Koopmans said...

Hey Nancy,

Very interesting post, and I say interesting because I can't *fathom* anyone being so darn mean.

Quick true story... once I was *one* person (on an editorial board) away from a six-figure advance with one of the top six, but the final word came back as a no...

Sure I was upset, but two years on, I'm like you, everytime I hear a Yes! from another blogger, it gives me hope that I'll get that final vote one of these days:)

Thanks for the post (and your comments over my way:)

Joanne said...

Good, thought-provoking post! Jealousy is part of human nature. I'd be lying if I didn't say I felt a little jealous of this person or that writer. But I'd also feel very, very happy for them because I understand what it takes to reach that goal, whatever it may be. When it comes to maliciousness and all that, we shouldn't let it get to us. We should move away from them and stick with those who support you, who encourage and inspire.

Dianne K. Salerni said...

Nancy, this is a very good post!

I think Tara is right, and jealousy happens in all walks of life and in all professions. It's only human nature to feel a few twinges when you see somebody get something you'd like to have. But part of being an adult is dealing with it.

I can't imagine getting hateful emails. Even more, I can't imagine WRITING one. After reading this post, I tried -- just for the creative exercise of it -- to compose a hateful email to a successful writer in my head. Err... I got nothin'.

If I ever need to write about a hateful email in a book, I'm going to have to work on that -- LOL!

Emily R. King said...

Wonderful thoughts, Nancy! I can't imagine being jealous of someone to the point of writing them hate mail. Someone would do that to a fellow writer? Really? Feeling a sense of competitiveness is good, and dare I say normal, but when you take it to the "I can't say anything nice" level, you've gone too far.

Julie Musil said...

This is a tough one. I've felt this too. Many times. But then I remember that this is their dream coming true, and that each of us has the same opportunity, if only we persevere. Great post, Nancy!

jamieayres said...

Great post. So far I haven't felt that jealousy . . . I'm just so haPPy for people when they land that book deal b/c I know how hard it is & I'd hope they'd be supportive of me when I have my day in the sun *fingers crossed. But I've definately seen it in my local writer's group, & at the school where I teach when teachers get awards for stuff. Idk . . . I guess it's normal? But life is short, be happy:):)

Heather M. Gardner said...

I feel it, for just a moment, then I have to let it go. But I know deep down, that I didn't work as hard as they did to get to the next step. Because I was doing something other than writing and they weren't. I can only blame myself and be insanely happy for them.

Thanks for coming to visit! Come up with anything for U, X or Z yet? :)

LynNerdKelley said...

I don't get jealous. At times, I doubt myself, but I never begrudge anyone else's success. I think feelings of jealousy are normal at times (especially if we're stressed out or exhausted, feeling down anyways), but those feelings don't stay with most people, I don't think. Sending nasty emails is terrible, and I can't imagine why anyone would do that. There must be underlying issues that those writers are dealing with.

Nancy said...

it's too bad that we can't just appreciate our own success or as in my case the process without tearing down others. Words hurt, writers should know their power better than anyone.

Heather Day Gilbert said...

I agree with Lyn, above...it's easier to be quick to doubt our own writing prowess in the face of others' success. But I tend to frequent blogs where the authors aren't bombastic about their personal wonderfulness, or if they are, it's just part of their personality and it's not offensive. Plus, I think it's just good manners, even if you are slightly jealous, not to shoot yourself in the foot and send hate emails! I'm appalled that some people allow bitterness to consume them like that, and potentially derail any feeling of camaraderie with other writers.

Lydia Kang said...

I wish I didn't get jealous of others but it happens, even when I should already be very happy. Recently I got hit by the GEM (sounds better than the green eyed monster!). First I wallowed. But then I used it to push myself to write a few thousand words.

Many of us will always want what someone else has. The good thing is that in publishing, there aren't just a few people allowed to publish, and then the doors close. The doors are ALWAYS open. And that's a great thing.

I also cannot fathom the idea that people would cut others down because they had success or good news. I'm shocked by the emails that Natalie got. There's enough hatred in the world, and enough room to cheer people when they have something to celebrate.

On the other hand, people with good news also need perspective. There's a forum I belong to and a certain author only pops in to tell everyone her good news--more rights sold, got this, got that, got a new book deal. It bothers me that they don't stick around for when people need cheering up and support. That, to me, is very telling of what kind of person that is.

Alexis Bass Writes said...

Jealousy is so natural, I think. It's kind of hard to avoid, especially when you want something SO bad. I find that having a little bit of arrogance helps. :) Like, you don't want to have ill feelings towards someone who one day will be your colleague, do you? NO! That's how I handle it. We all have our own path. Usually, I am most jealous of people being published or landing agents quickly--but I remind myself that though it might *seem* quick to me, for them it was probably not very quick. Not everyone is as honest about their struggles as Natalie, after all.

Stephen Tremp said...

I can't understand that jealousy and bitterness thing. I support people and their successes. People reap what they sow and good things will happen if you support other people. That's my motto.

And thanks for stopping by M Pax's blog and saying hello!

Jasmine Walt said...

I think it's natural for us to be a little jealous/envious/whatever-you-wanna-call-it, but I would never begrude someone else for their success. People who do that are small-minded. They're the same type of people that tell you you'll never be able to achieve your dream.

Those people are small minded, and as Mark Twain said, "Keep away from those who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the great make you believe that you too can become great."

Oh, and btw, I know the artist who made that painting! Well, I know his kids. :D

Empty Nest Insider said...

Great post Nancy and I'm jealous that you thought of it first! A little jealousy is normal sometimes, but some people really go off the deep end. Julie

Deana said...

Wow! I don't know where I've been. I had no idea this was going on. I mean sure, I knew about the whole bummed out that it wasn't me thing. I get that sometimes and I read Rachelle's post too, but I'm like you, for the most part seeing my blog buddies land their dream agents makes me happy and gives me hope. It makes me sad to think that people would go a bash another for doing the same thing they want to do. So sad.

Cynthia Chapman Willis said...

I am always thrilled for people who succeed because this industry is so tough and writing can be grueling. Most important of all, though, is that every writer has his or her own style, voice, etc. There is no point in comparing or competing because each work is unique. I don't get the jealously. Does someone else's success make the rest of us reflect on our own journeys? Sure. But maybe that's good. Maybe that helps us to hone our craft, work harder, continue to strive for our own goals. IMO, only good can come from supporting other writers, in good times and bad.

RachelMaryBean said...

Wow, this really surprises me, everyone I've met so far has been so supportive of each other!
I'll admit, I feel that twinge of jealousy sometimes, but I'm always happy for them, too. I'm like you, it makes me hopeful. 'That could be me someday', kinda' feeling. :)

Freak-YA-tastic said...

Hi!

It's a great post. It makes me realize something I wasn't aware of.

I'm just at my first wave of queries sent and since I read people getting an agent and I'm not jealous. Like someone wrote it, it gives me hope. I'm french and I know I've got tons of work to do and tons of books to write before landing an agent.

I can understand jealousy at some point. It's so hard to find an agent and a publisher but I'll never understand why people send awful emails.

Also, about followers posting less comments on writers' blog, it's sad and also disturbing because I don't understand why followers are less enthousiasts all of a sudden.

Being a writer is not the easier path to follow.

Susan Roebuck said...

I admit to feeling somewhat envious when I hear of author-friends' successes, but I'm also very happy for them because I believe they deserve it. I'd never ever write authors down because I believe in authors helping other authors (it's tough enough for us out there as it is).

Juliana L. Brandt said...

I agree that it's more of an envy than jealousy- the hope and yearning that I'll find success, too, but we are in such a strong, loving community that I can't help but feel honest excitement for the success of others.

Eva Gallant said...

I'm happy for anyone who achieves success! Whenever friends have had a book published, I'm among the first to order it from Amazon!

LindaK said...

Jealousy is such a difficult part of human nature to deal with - both for the jealous person and the recipient. As writers, though, supposedly deep-thinking, sensitive souls, it seems so out of place. Shame that playground habits die so hard! I'm shocked to hear that people get hate-'mail' for being successful - I think I'll keep any successes I have to myself from now on...

Metz said...

I definitely fight the jealousy bug way too much. For me, it discourages me a great deal, but that's just my personality. Now, if I don't know the person very well, then I tend to do the opposite and think, "Hey, if they can do it, so can I!"

klahanie said...

Hi Nancy,
I know you have been eagerly anticipating a comment from shy and humble me. Okay, maybe a slight exaggeration. Did I ever mention I was delusional? lol
A fascinating article with fascinating replies. Personally and this is the truth, I am not jealous or envious of writers, published or otherwise. I suppose that maybe because I have no expectations of my writing and use writing merely as a therapeutic resource. If anything, I applaud and admire those who have the resilience and the determination to realise their writing dreams.
Okay, I'm slightly jealous of Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet star. If only I, a mere human, could formulate writing as well as her. Which reminds me, Nancy, Penny has bestowed an award upon your good self. She would also like you to know you are under no obligation to acknowledge the award. You may do with it as you seem fit.
Have a peaceful day and may you continue to embrace the magic of the written word.
With respect and kind wishes, Gary and yes indeed, Penny :)

M Pax said...

Really? People send nasty emails? I don't get that. We all need each other. Just because you land an agent and a publisher, doesn't mean it's the end of a rocky journey. For many writers, they still struggle. It's a tough business.

A little jealousy is natural, but to cut others down because of it isn't right. Karma can be a B and all that.

Cathy Olliffe-Webster said...

What a lively blog you have, Nancy. Fabulous post on something very real and a fascinating discussion from readers. I have nothing new to add (I agree with many), other than to say thank goodness for Alex and his blog and you dropping by to say hi.

Donelle Lacy said...

Wow, you're right! Our posts could be companions! Yours is about jealousy and mine's about envy. Very neat.

I agree with M Pax here that even if we feel jealous of other writers (or envious as I say in my post), we shouldn't tear them down. We also shouldn't feel badly about ourselves. We should use their success as a springboard for our own. Learn from their strategy. They did it, so we can too!

Grumpy Bulldog, Media Mogul said...

I get jealous of other writers all the time, especially those no-talent hacks who get six-figure deals while I'm working my butt off for crumbs.

Callie Leuck said...

Wow! It's one thing to be jealous or envious of another person's success, and quite another to tear them down because of it. I get jealous of lots of people, but most of that is just awe! I definitely don't begrudge them their success -- I applaud them. And it definitely gives me hope :)

MISH said...

I would imagine that a dose of "healthy envy" is natural... but to be deliberately malicious and nasty... you've just burst my bubble... distorted my rose-coloured perception of this amazing & supportive online writing community... it seems like "amazing & supportive" applies when you're in the same boat as everybody else, struggling to be recognised...
On a lighter note, there must be some "they-all-lived-happily-ever-after-stories" out there...
Great post - a real "eye-opener"... !

Rawknrobyn.blogspot.com said...

I am always struggling with the green-eyed monster. I'm still happy to express my happiness for others - if they are nice people and only if they are nice people - but the monster lives on. Thanks for this post, Nancy.
xoRobyn

Karen Elizabeth Brown said...

I'm still new enough in my writing experience that I find happiness for others when they land a deal or publish a book. I recognize my own struggles in their comments about writing their books. It's good to hear somebody is making it!

The Golden Eagle said...

It gives me hope when I read about someone else's successes, since it just shows that what I'm trying to do isn't so impossible, which it certainly feels like when I'm struggling. I do feel jealousy as well--but who doesn't?

Kirsten said...

Actually, when someone leaves the ranks of the unpublished it makes me proud and happy, and hopeful. But that's just me I guess.
I can't imagine trying to tear them down, even if I've decided that what they do isn't something I want to emulate. Each of us has our own story to tell, and when one of them shines brightly it makes all of us more brilliant.

Great blog, you'll find me visiting more often. :)

Donna K. Weaver said...

Seriously? Natalie's gotten nasty emails because something good--that's she's been working for for YEARS--came to her? What's wrong with people?

Usually, I find the writerly folks in the blogosphere to be wonderfully supportive. I guess there has to be a few bad apples.

And no. I love to hear about other people's success. It doesn't take anything from me.

Timothy Fish said...

Envy happens. I'm sure all of us have envied someone at some point in our lives. By its nature, it can be hurtful to other people. But the person who envies is the person who must find a way to deal with it. For many, the way they deal with it is by cutting the connection with the object of their envy.

Pearl said...

Having not had any success in the writing field -- yet! -- I've not gotten a lot of hate mail. But I do know bloggers that have. I think it's in our nature to wonder why the good things that happen to others can't happen to us. It's also in our nature to sometimes not reflect on the fact that whatever good thing happened did not happen in a vacuum but was as a result of hard work and perseverance.

Pearl

Mia Hayson said...

I love reading of other people's success. I know some get jealous, but I've never seen the point of it a) because wonderful news shows us that if you are determined enough one day might soon become today le ii) being envious isn't going to help anyone, hehe and c) I LIKE good news.

Also, I like to think of the road to publication like your very own novel, and there will be struggle and there will most certainly be low points, but its all in order that you get to the end; your end, and it has to be unique.

Sooo, idk, I've never gotten jealous but whenever I'm feeling a little lost I like to sit and think this particular moment is making an excellent chapter in my journey.

<3

Melodie Wright said...

I have a friend right now who's scaling the heights with her debut, a literary novel. And I am nothing but happy for her. She's earned her success through hard work and perseverance. It's so fun to help her promote and (hopefully) be able to brag about her when she's famous. And I know she'd do the same for me. Like other commentors have said, that kind of success fuels my optimism rather than any envy.

Jade Hart said...

Hey Nancy.
I finally found you. I'm so sorry it took me forever to return your follow. Busy few days here in middle earth. I love your post on sticking together and not burning bridges. I totally, whole-heartedly agree. In fact I like you so much, I'm going to put your blog on my blog-list so I can read every post :) talk soon

C.M.Brown said...

Hi Nancy, Thanks for joining my site, I was saddened to read this blog. I believe in Karma and people who treat others badly will receive their just rewards! Well actually when you think about it the hate mail writer's are already recieving theirs as they haven't had the positive results they were looking for in their work anyway!

Surely there is enough of a market out there in the big wide world for everyone to receive their piece of the pie?

Being new to this Blogging world I have not read the Blogs of the author you have spoken about, but if what you say is true, one must feel sorry for her, it is a sad and negative way to live!

Carolyn

Joylene said...

I must be living in la-la-land. I had no idea such things happened. That's actually disgusting to think one writer would send nasty emails to another because of their success. Sad. We're supposed to be a community of like-minded people. We hang out together because as writers we know we're a strange bunch, and who would understand us better than another writer. Very sad. I hear of another writer's success and I'm instantly filled with encouragement and hope. I think I'd stay away from those others.

Suze said...

'Some writers have blogged about how they receive nasty emails from people,'

Yowch.

Writing is tough because there is vulnerability at every check point and it is such a public process. I don't have much to say about this post but I read it with interest, (and a smidge of horror!)

Celesta said...

I love reading about the success of other writers and I'm always so pleased when they are willing to open up and share their journey. I'm like you. I think, "Good for them. They worked hard and never gave up and look what happened. I can do the same."

Success is not a limited resource. There's always enough to go around. Thanks for this post. I'd never really considered the idea of decreasing interest and waning blog tension when an author finds success.

I found your blog through the Campaign and I'm a new follower!